Another return

Postcard from Poland #2

Returning to Poland is never easy. I’ve written about that many times in a very pessimistic tone. However this time, it’s different

I spent a week in Bulgaria, where of course one is still forced to confront multiple political and socio-cultural pathologies that have emerged since the restoration of capitalism in 1989, but they are somewhat different in terms of quantity and quality from those in Poland. Leaving Poland pretty much always feels like a moment of liberation. I’ve had my fair share of weirdness during the past couple of days, but also some great political discussions and a lot of joy with some fantastic people. I was politically truly saddened to have to go back to Poland.

Yet this time, my return turned out to be far from drastic. On the contrary, after a week of detachment from what has been happening here, I had no idea that the ruling right-wing, Catholic-fundamentalist hardliners were in big trouble, and that the government coalition is about to fall apart.

You might think that the Polish opposition has finally created a meaningful political offer that has enabled it to compete with the crazy nationalist kabbalah at the top? No, absolutely not.

The Polish opposition, including the parliamentary left, are probably politically the most impotent group in the modern history of Europe. For six years, they have not been able to come up with any ideas on how to fight against not even politicians, but a backward clique of power-hungry hooligans who have done pretty much nothing except staging witch hunts, fear-porn festivals against Russians and LGBT people and Catholic-fundamentalist rampages.

Since our professional democrats and citizens could not combat the nationalist-religious menace, other species had to step in, and now the government is in crisis thanks to minks, foxes and other furry animals that our supreme leader, Jarosław Kaczyński is a fan of. He does not want them bred for fur anymore in Poland. Watch yesterdays’ live show to see how his affection for animals could cost him power in Poland.

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