St. Business and the left-wing devil 

Romania and Poland fit perfectly into the neoliberal tendencies still holding strong in Eastern Europe. That is, to ignore and demonize those who question the system and to blame all problems on minorities.

“In Romania there has been a lot of talk in the last decades on the country’s alleged subordinate position to the Soviet Union after the Second World War. But if you raise some questions about today’s servitude to the US, you are immediately smeared as a stooge of Russia or China. You can’t have the status of an independent and critical intellectual. Today you just cannot have an independent opinion.” — Maria Cernat in Barricade’s weekly podcast on 6 September 2020. 

Cernat brings up the recent twisting of procedures regarding a huge purchase of military equipment by the Romanian defense ministry from Raytheon. The government is buying massive amounts of weapons and spending millions of lei while poverty across the nation is rampant. Economic inequality has hit record levels, society is in a state of decline and no institutions do their job. The only explanation that the ruling class was able to offer for the last three decades regarding the piling up of social problems was that there is a lot of corruption which was inherited from “communism” and this is the only phenomenon to blame, alongside the social democrats who are also “post-communist”.  

The Polish-Bulgarian journalist Boyan Stanislavski explains in the discussion that in Poland during the 90s the Left was almost completely silenced and their opinions and analyses totally unheard:: 

“However, today, when our predictions are playing themselves out, nobody cares that we were right 10 or 20 years ago. Nobody looks for alternatives. So, the so-called cancel culture is in fact an old phenomenon. In Poland the left has consistently been ignored or mistreated, in other words — canceled. Pretty much like today.” 

Watch the entire conversation on our YouTube channel and don’t forget to subscribe to and like the video. This will help us make our analysis more popular, and more people will have the chance to get familiar with the political, social and economic problems in Eastern Europe.

Photo: Pixabay, CC0

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